Simply, Cheese
A celebration of one of the finest
bits of cuisine.
Cheese, oh glorious cheese.
Reblogged from ilovecharts, Posted by ilovecharts.
ilovecharts:

From Pop Chart Lab (prints available)

ilovecharts:

From Pop Chart Lab (prints available)

A follow up on our Monterey Jack post (can be found here), this recipe uses Pepper Jack cheese, which is simply Monterey Jack with added hot peppers (often jalapeño or habanero).
The dish pictured is a spicy chicken and pepper jack flatbread. The toppings are onion, bell pepper, salsa, chicken, pepper jack cheese (of course!), and cilantro. A very good use for this spicy cheese, if you ask me!
The recipe for this deliciousness can be found here.

A follow up on our Monterey Jack post (can be found here), this recipe uses Pepper Jack cheese, which is simply Monterey Jack with added hot peppers (often jalapeño or habanero).

The dish pictured is a spicy chicken and pepper jack flatbread. The toppings are onion, bell pepper, salsa, chicken, pepper jack cheese (of course!), and cilantro. A very good use for this spicy cheese, if you ask me!

The recipe for this deliciousness can be found here.

Second in our little series on more common “table cheeses”, Monterey Jack is an American cow’s milk cheese that has historic roots in California.
First made in North America in the 1700’s by the Mexican missionaries in Monterey, California, the cheese we now know as jack had come from Spain, a "descendent of the semi-soft Italian cheeses that fed Caesar’s armies." It was not until a businessman by the name of David Jack began to make and sell the cheese commercially that it gained widespread popularity. Initially called “Jack’s Cheese”, the switch to “Monterey Jack” supposedly came after people continually asked for the cheese made by a man called Monterey Jack.
It has a mild flavour, and melts beautifully, making it delicious in sandwiches or in Latin American dishes (such as melted atop an enchilada!).

Second in our little series on more common “table cheeses”, Monterey Jack is an American cow’s milk cheese that has historic roots in California.

First made in North America in the 1700’s by the Mexican missionaries in Monterey, California, the cheese we now know as jack had come from Spain, a "descendent of the semi-soft Italian cheeses that fed Caesar’s armies." 
It was not until a businessman by the name of David Jack began to make and sell the cheese commercially that it gained widespread popularity. Initially called “Jack’s Cheese”, the switch to “Monterey Jack” supposedly came after people continually asked for the cheese made by a man called Monterey Jack.

It has a mild flavour, and melts beautifully, making it delicious in sandwiches or in Latin American dishes (such as melted atop an enchilada!).

Our First "Submission": "http://www.luls4.me/pimpcane_120.htm"

This is hardly a cheese submission, Lavern (if that is your real name).
Figured I’d fix that for you.

Behold. Pecorino al Tartufo with a pimp cane (and other pimptastic accouterments!)

Havarti is a semi-soft Danish cow’s milk cheese. It originated on a farm called Havarthigaard, found in Øverød, just north of Copenhagen. Hanne Nielsen, the operator, named the cheese after its birth place.
Generally, the cheese is very light in colour, with small holes and a smooth texture. It has a buttery, slightly sweet taste. Depending on variety, the levels of sweetness and sharpness will vary. You can find also havarti with various flavourings added (the above picture is an herbed havarti).
Havarti can easily be sliced, melted, eaten plain or with fruit, put on and in various dishes, thus making it a very versatile cheese! Try it with summer fruits, on sandwiches, or even in macaroni and cheese.

Havarti is a semi-soft Danish cow’s milk cheese. It originated on a farm called Havarthigaard, found in Øverød, just north of Copenhagen. Hanne Nielsen, the operator, named the cheese after its birth place.

Generally, the cheese is very light in colour, with small holes and a smooth texture. It has a buttery, slightly sweet taste. Depending on variety, the levels of sweetness and sharpness will vary. You can find also havarti with various flavourings added (the above picture is an herbed havarti).

Havarti can easily be sliced, melted, eaten plain or with fruit, put on and in various dishes, thus making it a very versatile cheese! Try it with summer fruits, on sandwiches, or even in macaroni and cheese.

Top quality cheese blog. :) <3

Why thank you!

& I promise it’ll update soon! It takes a bit of time to put posts together, and time is a precious commodity that can be hard to come by! ;)

In the meantime: May delicious dairy goodness always be on your side (and on your table)!

A croque monsieur is a French ham and cheese sandwich, which has been dipped in an egg batter and fried.
This lovely example uses D&#8217;Affinois cheese, which is similar in most aspects to brie.

A croque monsieur is a French ham and cheese sandwich, which has been dipped in an egg batter and fried.

This lovely example uses D’Affinois cheese, which is similar in most aspects to brie.

Huntsman is a layered combination of two British cheeses: Double Gloucester and Blue Stilton.
It is hand layered by the Long Clawson Dairy in England, and is a trademarked name. If any similar cheese combinations are made, they must be called something else (for example Stilchester).
Double Gloucester is a cheddar-style cheese made from the raw milk of Gloucester cows. It is aged twice as long as single Gloucester, and has a stronger flavor.
Stilton (this blog&#8217;s entry on Stilton can be found here) is a crumbly, creamy blue cheese, made from cow&#8217;s milk as well.

Huntsman is a layered combination of two British cheeses: Double Gloucester and Blue Stilton.

It is hand layered by the Long Clawson Dairy in England, and is a trademarked name. If any similar cheese combinations are made, they must be called something else (for example Stilchester).

Double Gloucester is a cheddar-style cheese made from the raw milk of Gloucester cows. It is aged twice as long as single Gloucester, and has a stronger flavor.

Stilton (this blog’s entry on Stilton can be found here) is a crumbly, creamy blue cheese, made from cow’s milk as well.

Sainte-Maure de Touraine is a French cheese, made from raw goat&#8217;s milk in the Touraine region of France. It comes in a small log with a straw down the middle, which keeps the cheese roll intact during production.
The cheese log has a bloomy mold rind, and is rolled in wood ash, giving it a distinctly dark exterior. It is aged longer than most goat&#8217;s milk cheeses, resulting in a firmer texture and a stronger, more developed flavor. Inside is pure white, with a walnut aroma and a tart, nutty taste. 
This cheese has AOC (Appellation d’Origine Contrôlée, or Controlled Designation of Origin) status and protection &#8212; similar cheeses that do not meet the AOC&#8217;s rigorous criteria are simply called Sainte-Maure.(Roquefort was the first of the French cheeses to get this distinction, in 1925.) 

Sainte-Maure de Touraine is a French cheese, made from raw goat’s milk in the Touraine region of France. It comes in a small log with a straw down the middle, which keeps the cheese roll intact during production.

The cheese log has a bloomy mold rind, and is rolled in wood ash, giving it a distinctly dark exterior. It is aged longer than most goat’s milk cheeses, resulting in a firmer texture and a stronger, more developed flavor. Inside is pure white, with a walnut aroma and a tart, nutty taste. 

This cheese has AOC (Appellation d’Origine Contrôlée, or Controlled Designation of Origin) status and protection — similar cheeses that do not meet the AOC’s rigorous criteria are simply called Sainte-Maure.
(Roquefort was the first of the French cheeses to get this distinction, in 1925.) 

Emmentaler is the cheese people in America, Canada, Australia, and New Zealand mean when they say &#8220;Swiss Cheese&#8221;. It is in fact Swiss, and is made from un-pasteurized cow&#8217;s milk.The classic version of this cheese is aged for a minimum of four months in traditional cellars. The premium variety (premier cru) is aged 14 months in humid caves.
The bubbles come late in production, as certain bacteria in the culturing process excrete carbon dioxide. Until recently, these holes were a sign of an imperfect product &#8212; now they are quite distinctive.
Emmentaler has a mild, slightly nutty flavor, and melts beautifully. It is often an ingredient in fondue, and is also used on sandwiches and other such delights.

Emmentaler is the cheese people in America, Canada, Australia, and New Zealand mean when they say “Swiss Cheese”. It is in fact Swiss, and is made from un-pasteurized cow’s milk.
The classic version of this cheese is aged for a minimum of four months in traditional cellars. The premium variety (premier cru) is aged 14 months in humid caves.

The bubbles come late in production, as certain bacteria in the culturing process excrete carbon dioxide. Until recently, these holes were a sign of an imperfect product — now they are quite distinctive.

Emmentaler has a mild, slightly nutty flavor, and melts beautifully. It is often an ingredient in fondue, and is also used on sandwiches and other such delights.